Values Parenting

25 Rules For My Son

This blog post is taken from the book by Walker Lamond. Rules for My Unborn Son.

I think there’s a lot of wisdom here and I’d like to share 25 of his rules. It applies to both girls and boys but I appreciate his male-oriented perspective. Fathers are SO important to the healthy development of their sons (and daughters!). These are simple rules with a much deeper meaning. Which of these are you teaching your children?

  1. Never shake a man’s hand sitting down.
  2. There are plenty of ways to enter a pool. The stairs ain’t one.
  3. The man at the grill is the closest thing we have to a king.
  4. In a negotiation, never make the first offer.
  5. Act like you’ve been there before. Especially in the end zone.
  6. Request the late check-out.
  7. When entrusted with a secret, keep it.
  8. Return a borrowed car with a full tank of gas.
  9. When shaking hands, grip firmly and look him in the eye.
  10. Don’t let a wishbone grow where a backbone should be.
  11. If you need music on the beach, you’re missing the point.
  12. You marry the girl, you marry her whole family.
  13. Be like a duck. Remain calm on the surface and paddle like crazy underneath.
  14. Experience the serenity of traveling alone (Me here: I would like to add, Can you be at peace when there is peace? Do you feel anxiety to fill the silence with the radio or news feeds on your phone? Can you be okay with just your thoughts? Can you be “in the moment” of serenity?)
  15. Never be afraid to ask out the best looking girl in the room.
  16. Never turn down a breath mint.
  17. In a game of HORSE, sometimes a simple free throw will get ’em.
  18. Try writing your own eulogy. Never stop revising.
  19. Thank a veteran. And then make it up to him.
  20. If you want to know what makes you unique, sit for a caricature.
  21. Eat lunch with the new kid.
  22. After writing an angry email, read it carefully. Then delete it.
  23. See it on the big screen.
  24. Give credit. Take the blame.
  25. Write down your dreams.
Advertisements

Back to Basics

Being raised with a small farm and a big work ethic, I have always appreciated how a back-to-basics approach to parenting is the answer to what ills many families today.

Simplifying our over-complicated, over-stimulated lives is what children need.

They need to count the stars, find shapes in clouds, run their hands through shifting mud, make shapes in the sand, listen to birds calling their young, and count their footsteps through pastures and fields.

Children with very little are rarely poor; it is those with too much who are creatively poor, who lack imagination and are short on grit.

Watch this insightful video that beautifully contrasts “The Poorness in our Wealth.”